RecipeHive

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Cathy’s Southern Waldorf Salad

Posted by in Shared Member Recipes

I wanted to make a summertime version of the classic Waldorf – with peaches and this is what I came up with. I’ll admit that the dressing I found is from a MyRecipes version that called for boiled shrimp and potatoes, which I didn’t want to include in my salad. So here is my adaptation of that recipe. Enjoy!

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Garlic and White Wine Steamed Clams

Posted by in Shared Member Recipes

1 1/2 lb Manilla clams (or Little neck)

3 Tbsp butter

1 Sour dough baguette, sliced

1 Tbsp olive oil, to be rubbed on baguette slices

1/4 cup shallots, minced

3 garlic cloves, minced

1/2 cup dry white wine

Sea salt to taste

Red pepper flakes to taste

3 Tbsp mixed herbs (parsley, mint, chives, etc , chopped

1 lemon, cut into wedges

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Wild Rice Pilaf with Dried Cranberries and Pecans

Posted by in Shared Member Recipes

With its nutty flavor and slightly chewy texture, wild rice is a welcome addition to the winter table. It is not a true rice but rather the seed of an aquatic grass that still grows wild in the northern Great Lakes area of the United States. In this recipe, wild rice can be mixed with short-grain brown rice, which is chewier and sweeter than long-grain brown varieties. This pilaf is also delicious when made with all short-grain brown rice; unlike white rice, it has not been processed, so its nutritious outer coating remains intact.

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Pearl Onions Au Gratin

Posted by in Shared Member Recipes

Barbara Lynch, chef-owner of No. 9 Park and six other Boston-area restaurants,  has served this dish for years, originally inspired by the pickled pearl onions her mother served as an appetizer on toothpicks. One of her favorite suppliers for fresh produce is farmer Chris Kurth of Siena Farms in Sudbury, Massachussets.

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Farro with Balsamic-Rosemary-Roasted Shallots and Grapes over Roasted Portobellos

Posted by in Shared Member Recipes

The ancient Tuscan grain known as farro sounds exotic but really couldn’t be friendlier. Think of it as barley-esque, only sexier. When tender, the grains will be a bit exploded, like barley. Because of farro’s Italian roots, this recipe uses a lovely Italian treat-roasted grapes and shallots-to marry the farro with roasted portobello caps. The finished dish is earthy, sweet, and tart all at once, and looks lovely at the center of the plate, garnished with a rosemary sprig.